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System Center Operations Manager 1801 Release – Web Console – Part 5 / 5: Custom dashboard walkthrough

What does the sample comprise of?

The sample is a JavaScript based application that is communicating with SCOM SDK and displaying data to the user who can take further action on the same. We have also tried to stretch the limit of custom widget here by not only limiting it to be used as a widget but rather as a standalone application in itself. This application could then be rendered as a dashboard or a widget, we leave the choice to you. The sample comprises of two major sections:

  • Overview Dashboard
  • Search Dashboard

Overview Dashboard

This is a view designed to give a quick overview about the current monitoring state. It can act as a starting page using which you can proceed with further actions. Below is a screenshot of how the Overview Dashboard looks like:

As displayed in the image above the Overview Dashboard has two major sections:

  • Active Alerts
  • Health States

Active Alerts

This section shows the active alerts for the past 7 days in three categories namely critical, warning and informational alerts. If you are interested, you may dive into the individual alerts by clicking “View Details”. For example if you click on “View Details” under critical alerts, you’d see a view like:

Need more information? You got it!
Each of these rows are clickable and would take you to our very own drilldown pages  (refer to blog 4/5 for more details on drilldown).

Once an alert above is clicked, it launches the following drilldown page:

As you can see, there is a lot more detail about the alert here which would help you in further investigating the issue.

Health States

For a given target class and given target object group you’d see the health states in three buckets namely unhealthy, in maintenance mode and healthy. The target class and target group field can be modified and the health state information displayed below would modify as per the new input. By default this view shows health state information about the “Windows Computer” SCOM class.
Similar to alert you can see the details of the entity by clicking “View Details”:

And yes, you guessed it right. We have drilldown pages for these entities as well! Here’s how they look like:

There is a bunch of information about the entity here like related objects (their health states and properties), the alerts targeted to this entity, performance metrics and the classes this entity belongs to. Most of the entries shown above can be drilled down further giving a more detailed view. Again, going over all the details is out of scope for this blog and we’d strongly recommend going over through the detailed documentation.

Search Dashboard

Know what you are looking for but hate to go over multiple pages and views in the current desktop or web console? Then this search section is designed just for you!
Here you can search for any active alert (for the last 7 days), SCOM object, SCOM group, SCOM class, rule or any monitor. The search is asynchronous and quite fast. It’d help you choose the starting point using which you can further drilldown. Below is a screenshot of how search looks like (say you search for the term “health”):

And that’s not it! Remember drilldown? From all of these search results you can jump to their drilldown pages and proceed with any action you may wish!
Below are a couple of screenshots portraying what you can expect after clicking these results (you have already seen the alert and object drilldown pages above when we were at Overview Dashboard):

Clicking a rule:

Clicking a monitor:

Well this is just the beginning! The intention of walking you over this sample application was to show you the power custom widget and in turn, the SCOM REST APIs provide. With a few lines of code, one can achieve functionality which would otherwise have taken a lot more steps.
Feel free to go through the SCOM REST API documentation and create your own user stories and your own custom widgets!

Deployment

There are multiple ways you can deploy the sample dashboard discussed in this blog:

  1. Importing the management pack
  2. Adding it alongside SCOM Web Console as a JavaScript application (with this the application will have its own URL and may or may not be added as a custom widget)
  3. Adding the two sections as individual widgets

Note: From now on we will refer to the content available in attached zip file: Custom-Widget

Importing the management pack

A management pack containing the two individual sections (overview and search) are available under “Custom Widget\Management Pack\”

Import this management pack and you should see two dashboards overview and search having the two sections respectively.

Adding it alongside SCOM Web Console as a JavaScript application

  1. Go to the directory where SCOM 1801 Web Console is installed. Ex. C:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center\Operations Manager\WebConsole\Dashboard\
  2. Create a folder named “custom”. Note that you may choose any folder name, this is just an example
  3. Copy the contents placed under “Custom Widget\Source Code\
  4. Go to SCOM Web Console
  5. Create a dashboard
  6. Click Add Widget and select Custom Widget from the dropdown.
  7. When asked for source code enter the following:
    < iframe src=”http://your_server_name/OperationsManager/custom ” style=”width: 100%; height: 100%”></iframe>
    Here replace your_server_name with your Web Server
  8. Hit save and you are done!

Adding the two sections as individual widgets

  1. Go to SCOM Web Console
  2. Create a dashboard
  3. Click Add Widget and select Custom Widget from the dropdown.
  4. When asked for source code pick the contents of any one file from under “Custom Widget\Individual Sections\
  5. Hit save
  6. Repeat 4 and 5 for the other one or repeat 2-5 if you wish to add these in separate dashboards

Documentation

Discussing the technical approach of how the sample widget presented here works is out of scope of this blog. The code has been documented thoroughly and documentation has been generated using JSDoc. The documentation can be found under “Custom Widget\Source Code\docs\”

Start with index.html and that would guide you through all the code.

How SCOM REST APIs can be used

Refer to “Custom Widget\Source Code\dist\js\helpers\data-helper.js” for an example of how SCOM REST APIs can be used.

For more details on SCOM REST APIs, please refer https://docs.microsoft.com/en-gb/rest/operationsmanager/

References

For the sample app discussed above, the following 3rd part libraries were used:

  1. jQuery: <script src=”https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.2.1/jquery.min.js”></script>
  2. jQuery UI: <script src=”https://code.jquery.com/ui/1.12.1/jquery-ui.js”></script>
  3. MetisMenu: <script src=”https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/metisMenu/2.7.1/metisMenu.min.js”></script>
  4. Bootstrap: <script src=”https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/twitter-bootstrap/3.3.7/js/bootstrap.min.js”></script>
  5. jQuery DataTables: <script src=”https://cdn.datatables.net/1.10.16/js/jquery.dataTables.min.js”></script>
  6. Bootstrap DataTables: <script src=”https://cdn.datatables.net/1.10.16/js/dataTables.bootstrap.min.js”></script>
  7. Responsive DataTables: <script src=”https://cdn.datatables.net/responsive/2.2.0/js/dataTables.responsive.min.js”></script>

All information on this blog series has been written by AdityaGoda on Microsoft TechNet. OKCIUS do not own any of the content displayed in this blog series.

System Center Operations Manager 1801 Release – Web Console – Part 4 / 5: New drilldown experience

The all new Drilldown experience

The new SCOM dashboards come with the drilldown feature which, as the name suggests, allows you to drilldown into a problem and get more insights about the situation. This is helpful in root causing the issue and in identifying what all components are affected by the problem. There are five type of drilldown pages:

  1. Alert page
  2. SCOM Group/Object page
  3. SCOM Class page
  4. Rule Page
  5. Monitor Page

These pages are dashboards of their own comprising of different widgets. The widgets present in these dashboards take up the context at runtime and scope their data to the current target entity. For ex. take a look at the below URL for alert drilldown page:
http://<server_name>/OperationsManager/#/monitoring/drilldown/alert/023e5e00-e9e9-4d81-8135-052bf935062f/dashboard/d0d82ac8-215b-3b77-7a3b-8bef450796e3?mpId=da187e72-b9d7-9e16-d098-3b0a624dc38c&show_full_screen_link=false&hide_header=true

The highlighted section tells the Alert drilldown page to display data in all widgets targeted to this alert. This makes sharing the drilldown pages within the organization super easy. All you need to do is share the URL and people can start off from there.

How to drilldown?

Well, the next obvious question is how to use the drilldown feature? The answer to that is simple. Some of the widgets discussed in 2. The all new HTML5 widgets and their actions allow you to click a row/entity from the data. Once you make your selection the drilldown page is launched. For ex. consider the state widget below:

Now when you click on any of the row above the Group/Object drilldown page is launched. That page then has widgets displaying all sorts of relevant data targeted to the selected row from the state widget.

Which drilldown page leads to where?

The starting point of drilldown could be either a row from the alert widget, a row from the state widget or a health icon from the topology widget. The user can then navigate to the other drilldown pages by clicking on items present in the widgets of the current drilldown page. Below diagram shows the path a user can navigate during drilldown.

For ex: from a State widget the user can drilldown and land at the SCOM Group/Object drilldown page and from there they can click one of the unhealthy monitors and land up in the Monitor Drilldown page.

Drilldown pages deep dive

Alert drilldown page

The alert drilldown page contains detailed information about the alert. Below is a screenshot of how the alert drilldown page looks like:

As clear from the above screenshot the alert drilldown page has 6 widgets. These represent the following data from left to right and top to bottom:

  1. Alert description: Here you will get detailed description for the alert like the workflow name, instance name etc.
  2. Alert context: All the context information for this alert would be displayed here
  3. Company knowledge: Any added company knowledge for the underlying rule or monitor for this alert would be displayed here. Read the text in the company knowledge widget above, you may discover a cool new feature 😊. Yes, you read it right, now SCOM supports adding HTML based company knowledge right from the Web Console.
    Just hit the ellipses icon () and you shall see a “Edit Company Knowledge” action. Fill in the company knowledge in the editor that shows up, choose the MP and hit save!
    Below are just some screenshots showing the flow:

    • Select the action
    • Enter the company knowledge
    • Choose MP (or create new one) and save
  4. Product knowledge: Here you will see the product knowledge added for the corresponding rule or monitor.
  5. Rule Properties: Would display the properties of the rule that generated this alert. It is blank in the above screenshot since this alert came from a monitor.
  6. History: Would show the history of changes to the resolution state of the alert.

Use cases

Scenario 1: Adding company knowledge without the burden of desktop console and Word

Many a times there are alerts which come up frequently in an environment. You might want to add information for your fellow operators to help them save time. But you don’t have access to Operations Console and an active Word deployment. This is where the Company knowledge widget in alert drilldown comes in handy. Just click the alert and once the “Alert drilldown page” opens up start editing the company knowledge without having to depend on Word or Operations Console.

SCOM Group/Object drilldown page

The SCOM Group/Object drilldown page shows detailed information about a SCOM Group/Object. Below is a screenshot of a sample SCOM Group/Object drilldown page:

As is evident from above the SCOM Object/Group page consists of 2 dashboards. The first one is the object information dashboard. This dashboard consists of 5 widgets:

  1. Object relationship and properties widget: This widget shows all the related objects to the current object along with their properties to the right. You can select any of the items from this diagram and the properties on the right would get updated. Notice the small health state icons on top of each entity. This would help you figure out if there are any related entities which are at the crucial stage too!
  2. Warning and critical alerts generated on this object
  3. The unhealthy monitors targeted on the current object. This is a really useful widget and can effectively tell you about the root cause for the critical or warning health state of the entity.
  4. Performance metrics: This widget is like a “Object By Performance Widget” and displays all the performance metrics related information for the current target object.
  5. Classes widget: All the classes the current entity belongs to is displayed in this widget.

The second one is the Performance dashboard. This dashboard shows one performance widget each for every performance object of the current entity. Below is an example:

User cases

This section tries to narrate a few possible scenarios which you might face regularly and where drilldown can really come in handy.

Scenario 1: A server in the environment is reporting a critical health state

In this case the user can click that server in the state widget and can launch the SCOM Group/Object drilldown page. Here you will find lots of valuable information which’d help you root cause and figure out the issue.
What all can you do to investigate the issue?

  • Check the related objects widget and see if some underlying entity is critical. For example, the hard drive might on the server may be critical (say because of less space) and thus the health of the server rolled up to be critical. Now you know you need to check the hard drive. This way you can keep drilling down and get to the root cause of the issue
  • Check the currently active alerts generated on this server. There would most probably be an alert sitting there clearly calling out the problem.
  • Check the unhealthy monitors widget if it contains any entries.
  • Check the performance metrics and see if there is any unusual behavior or spikes.

You are highly likely to discover the root problem with the above-mentioned steps. If not, then keep drilling down wherever you find anything suspicious.

Scenario 2: A server is reporting delays and unexpected behavior

Now is a good time to check for the performance data collected from the server. Simply select the server from a state widget and then once the “SCOM Group/Object drilldown page” opens, select the 2nd tab “Performance”. Here you’d see all the performance data collected from the server and you most probably should see a spike or abnormal behavior.

 

SCOM Class drilldown page

The SCOM Class drilldown page gives information about a SCOM class. Below is a sample screenshot of how the SCOM class page looks like:

This drilldown page has 3 widgets:

  1. Class properties widget displaying all the properties of the class
  2. Rule widget: Showing information about all the rules targeted to this class
  3. Monitor widget: Showing information about all the monitors targeted to this class

Use Cases

Scenario 1: Figuring out all targeted rules and monitors of a class

Not only that you can then even go ahead and look up those rules/monitors and even modify their company knowledge.

Rule drilldown page

The Rule drilldown page shows detailed information about a SCOM Rule. Below is a sample screenshot:

The Rule drilldown page has 4 widgets.

  1. The rule properties widget displaying all the properties of the rule.
  2. A rule configuration widget displaying the configuration of the rule as present in the management pack
  3. A company knowledge widget where the user can see the company knowledge for this rule. Users can also edit the company knowledge here if they have sufficient permission.
  4. A product knowledge widget where the user can see the product knowledge for the rule.

Use Cases

Scenario 1: You want to check the rule properties and/or modify the company knowledge

 

Monitor drilldown page

The Monitor drilldown page shows detailed information about a SCOM Monitor. Below is a sample screenshot:

The Monitor drilldown page has 3 widgets.

  1. The monitor properties widget displaying all the properties of the monitor.
  2. A company knowledge widget where the user can see the company knowledge for this monitor. Users can also edit the company knowledge here if they have sufficient permission.
  3. A product knowledge widget where the user can see the product knowledge for the monitor.

All information on this blog series has been written by AdityaGoda on Microsoft TechNet. OKCIUS do not own any of the content displayed in this blog series.

System Center Operations Manager 1801 Release – Web Console – Part 3 / 5: The new HTML5 Widgets

The new HTML5 Widgets

There are a total of 6 widgets that are shipped with SCOM 1801 :

  • Alert Widget
  • State Widget
  • Performance Widget
  • Topology Widget
  • Tile Widget
  • Custom Widget

These widgets are designed to be fast and robust. It’s quick to load, unlike Silverlight. The widgets support a high level of customization to ensure that they can be used effectively by one and all.
One important thing to note is that the data refresh for these widgets happens in the background at the defined interval (or you can do a force refresh). This way you always have some data to work on while the new chunk is being fetched in the background. Thus, the widgets and the dashboard in general feels a lot more responsive.

Widgets are stored in the management packs as views. Below is a snippet from a management pack containing a “Tile widget”

Note the TypeID. This is a new TypeID introduced for HTML widgets.

Types of Widgets

Alert Widget

This widget displays the list of alerts for a given criteria. Refer to the authoring parameters section below to learn more about the customizations that can be done.

Authoring Parameters

When you start off with the authoring for alert widgets you’d see something like this:

As clear from above there are 4 sections at high level:
Scope

In this section you can define the groups/objects to which this widget is to be targeted. For ex. If you enter “All Windows Computers” then this widget would show the alerts targeted to “All Windows Computers”.

Criteria

Here you can filter alerts based on their severity, priority, resolution state and age.
Take note of the age parameter. At times you might get better performance out of this widget if you select a suitable value for the age parameter.

Display

Here you can select what all columns you wish to see in the widget. Additionally you may select a column with which you wish to group the alerts.

Completion

Finally you give the widget a name and description and you’re done!

Optionally you may specify the refresh interval (minimum value 1 minute) in which the widget would refresh its data.

Actions

Alert widget supports the following actions:

Setting resolution state

You can select one or more alerts and select this action. Once selected it’d open the right pane where you set the state and give an optional comment.

Exporting to Excel

The data shown in the widget can be exported in excel format. This helps when you wish to do any custom analysis on the data by leveraging the power of Excel.

Personalization

Widgets can be personalized for each user. Each user can select the column they wish to see and the grouping they wish to apply. In other words “Personalization” is like the “Display” section shown in authoring.
Note: The selection made in “Personalization” would always overwrite the selection made in the “Display” section. Also note that personalization data is stored in the browser in the current system and thus if you switch browsers or machine
then you’d have to re-personalize the widgets.

Edit & Delete Widget
As the name suggests you can edit and delete this widget from a dashboard. Note: This action is permanent and all the users having access to these dashboards would be affected by it.

State Widget

The state widget displays the health state information about the targeted entities satisfying a particular criterion. Refer to the authoring parameters section below to learn more about the customizations that can be done on this widget.

Authoring Parameters

When you start off with the authoring for state widgets you’d see something like this:

As clear from above there are 4 sections at high level:
Scope

In this section you can define the groups/objects to which this widget is to be targeted. For ex. If you enter “All Windows Computers” then this widget would show the health state information targeted to “All Windows Computers”.
There is another required parameter, class.
You also have the option here to get the health state of the group or the entities contained in that group which are the individual objects.

Criteria

Here you can set the filter to see the entities only in particular health states.

Display & Completion

Display and completion section of the state widget is similar to that of Alert Widget except for one difference. The display columns for the state widget are defined as per the “class” selected in the Scope section whereas the alert widget has fixed display columns.

Actions

State widget supports the following actions:

All of these are exactly similar to what has been defined for alert widget above.

Performance Widget

The performance widget displays the information about the different counters associated with the entity. Refer to the authoring parameters section below to learn more about the customizations that can be done on this widget.

Authoring Parameters

When you start off with the authoring for performance widgets you’d see something like this:

As clear from above there are 5 sections at high level:
Scope

In this section you can define the groups/objects to which this widget is to be targeted. For ex. If you enter “All Windows Computers” then this widget would show the health state information targeted to “All Windows Computers”.

Metrics

Here you can select the object, counter and instance triplet whose data would be displayed in the widget.

Criteria

Here you can specify the age of data that you are interested in.

Display

This section is important. If you wish to visualize the widget with a graph then the above act as legend columns. If you wish to only see these columns then you can check “Visualize objects by performance”. Then you’d only see the table without the graph.

Completion

This section is similar to Alert widget.

Actions

Performance widget supports the following actions:

All of these are exactly similar to what has been defined for alert widget above except for “Set Vertical Axis”. With this action you can specify a range and the graph is scoped to that. This is useful when you are trying to drilldown on particular events. This is how it looks like:

Topology Widget

Have a Visio or other image of your IT topology? Wish there was a way to map the health states to these entities? Then topology widget is what you are looking for. Refer to the authoring parameters section below to learn more about the customizations that can be done on this widget.

Authoring Parameters

As clear from above there are 3 sections at high level:
Scope

This is exactly similar as State Widget.

Display

This is the section where you upload and select your IT topology image:

Completion

Similar to State Widget.

Actions

When a topology widget is created, you’d see all the health icons placed at the top left corner. Drag the icons and place them at relevant places on the image and hit save once you are done. Below image shows an example of how  it works.

Apart from this, the topology widget supports the standard edit and delete widget actions.

Tile Widget

Need a quick way to investigate the health of an entity and the current alerts generated on it? Tile widget is the answer for you. This is the smallest widget (size wise) in the dashboard. Below is a sample tile widget:

As can be seen clearly, the current health state of “All Windows Computers” group is Warning state. This is because the availability monitor is in warning state resulting in the health rollup.

Authoring Parameters

The authoring for tile widget is very straightforward and is like a subset of “Alert Widget” as can be seen in the image below:

Actions

Apart from edit and delete widget the user can launch the health explorer for the target entity from topology widget. Isn’t that cool? 😊

Use the health explorer to dig down further on the health state of the entity and its monitors

Custom Widget

SCOM 1801 release marks the inception of REST based APIs to fetch SCOM data thus giving birth to custom widget. With custom widget, you could bring in any custom html code and it’d get rendered as a widget which could then reside with other widgets in the dashboard. This brings in a whole new strength to the dashboards since the power to manipulate and render the data is completely up to you. For sample scripts to talk to REST APIs, please visit the official documentation here.

Below is a diagram to show how custom widget works:

For details about SCOM REST APIs visit here <<Insert link to SCOM REST APIs>>. Below is a screenshot showing custom widget in action:

Authoring Parameters

The authoring of custom widget is straightforward and requires just an HTML source code. Note if you have any JavaScript (which you most probably would have) you’ll have to insert it inline with the HTML code. Below is a screenshot taken while authoring custom widget with a basic HTML code:

Below is an image taken from the detailed documentation:

Can you figure out which are the custom widgets above? If your answer is no, then that’s exactly how we intended it to be! The custom widget simply blends with other widgets in the dashboard and once created acts no differently from the other widgets. Well, if your answer was yes then we’ve got to give it to you, you are really insightful 😊

Actions

Custom widget supports the basic edit and delete widget actions. But this in no way limits you to innovate! You can define and design custom actions for your custom widgets which could then reside in the widget container. The limit here is just your imagination!

All information on this blog series has been written by AdityaGoda on Microsoft TechNet. OKCIUS do not own any of the content displayed in this blog series.

System Center Operations Manager 1801 Release – Web Console – Part 2 / 5: New Dashboards

The new Dashboards

The SCOM 1801  Web Console introduces the all new, fully customizable, dashboards. These dashboards are built and fine-tuned keeping in mind the huge volume of IT monitoring data. This ensures that you get next to real-time monitoring information without compromising on performance.
The dashboards, being built in HTML5, support a wide range of modern browsers including Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge, Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.

Below is a screenshot of a sample dashboard:

As portrayed in the above screenshot, a dashboard is comprised of multiple widgets. These widgets can be completely configured for data, display and positioning within the dashboard in a manner that best suits your needs.
Currently the dashboard supports the following widgets:

  • Alert Widget
  • State Widget
  • Performance Widget
  • Topology Widget
  • Tile Widget
  • Custom Widget

Dashboard Actions

The dashboard supports the following actions:

Creating a dashboard

You can create a new dashboard by selecting the “+ New Dashboard” option in the navigation tree as shown below:

This would popup a right pane as follows:

Wish to add this dashboard in a new MP? Don’t worry, you needn’t go back to the SCOM console. Just hit the “+” next to the MP list and you’d get a section allowing you to create a new MP and add this dashboard to it.

Deleting a dashboard

To delete a dashboard simply hit the “Delete Dashboard” button on top and when prompted hit “Yes”

Editing a dashboard

The edit operation allows the user to edit the name of the dashboard as well as the layout of the widgets added to it.
Once you hit the edit action, the dashboard name becomes an editable field.

Also, all the widgets can now be dragged and resized. This is really useful when you want to club together the widgets targeted to similar objects/groups.

Once you are done, hit “Save Changes” and your layout is saved!

Adding a Widget

When you create a new dashboard it is empty and has no widgets. You can click on the “+ Add Widget” action on top of the dashboard that would lead to the right pane popping up as shown below:

There are lots of widgets that are shipped in box. All of them are discussed in detail in the next part.

Viewing in Full Screen

Wish to only view the dashboard in a big screen like a projector? That’s now possible!
Hit the “View in Full Screen” link on top of the dashboard and you’d get a full screen view of the dashboard.

Exporting Dashboards

Dashboard once created can easily be exported. To export a dashboard, the user simply needs to export the management pack in which the dashboard is stored. If you drilldown into the exported management pack, you’d observe that the dashboard is defined as a view. So for ex. If a dashboard is created as shown below:

Then the generated MP would look like this (note below just a snippet from the MP is taken to avoid clutter):

Note the TypeID of the view. This is a new TypeID introduced for HTML dashboards. Rest of the structure of the MP is pretty similar to any other view.

All information on this blog series has been written by AdityaGoda on Microsoft TechNet. OKCIUS do not own any of the content displayed in this blog series.

System Center Operations Manager 1801 Release – Web Console – Part 1 / 5: Summary

 

This series of blogs intends to introduce the new SCOM Web Console released in System Center Operations Manager 1801. For details on implementation and other parameters please refer to the detailed documentation. This blog is designed to be a bit more informal and describes the different features by associating them to use cases.
The series is divided into different parts and it is recommended to read them in order for better understanding.

After going through this series of blogs a user would:

  • Get a fair idea about the new SCOM Web Console and the different features added to it
  • Understand the new dashboard capability
  • Understand the different widgets and their customizations
  • Learn about the different dashboard and widget actions
  • Learn about the drilldown feature and how it can be used to investigate issues
  • Get a walkthrough on how to create a custom web application on SCOM REST APIs

This series consists of the following other blogs:

What’s new?

The SCOM 1801 release marks the inception of a faster, modern, flexible and more reliable HTML based Web Console. The Web Console has been given a complete reboot to ensure that it fulfills modern day monitoring needs (and yes, it is now completely free from Silverlight!).
This is another step towards our continuous commitment to the SCOM community and we would like to give a big thanks to all our customers who voted this as the top most requested feature in SCOM User Voice. We are really excited about this new Web Console and we strongly believe that you’d just fall in love with it!

Still using Silverlight? Don’t worry, they’ve got that covered too! The Silverlight dashboards are available in a new URL:
http://<Your_Web_Server_Name>/Dashboard

Authentication

The new SCOM Web Console brings back the network authentication! This is what you’d see when you visit the Web Console for the first time:

Choose your preferred login option and you are in, welcome to the new SCOM Web Console!

All information on this blog series has been written by AdityaGoda on Microsoft TechNet. OKCIUS do not own any of the content displayed in this blog series.